Saturday, November 26, 2011

L.A. City #14 Found!


(Photo Copyright 2011 Will Maguire.)

OK, it wasn't missing! But we found it anyways! It's owned by Surf Line Hawaii and it is now prominently displayed inside the brand spanking new "ocean lifestyle" retail warehouse store of Surf Line Hawaii (x-ref: Jams World), in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Check it out!





It is a "Pete Peterson" paddleboard, circa 1940's (we think). Hopefully, our paddleboard curators will post on this. Tom Volk: What do you think? Cal Porter: Please confirm and tell us a story!


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And last but certainly not least, many, many thanks to "Baby Dave" Rochlen for inviting us to visit him at the Surf Line Hawaii warehouse store. Baby Dave, some of our readers will recall, grew up in Pt. Dume in Malibu and attended SAMOHI, and was a Zuma Recurrent beach lifeguard, who Cal Porter remembers fondly as one of a group of recurrent groms who perfected "the quasimoto" (see below) surfing pose and who Cal clearly remembers casually shooting out of a tube ride one day at Pt. Dume as follows:

"I watched Baby Dave come shooting out of a tubular wave (rare) at Pt Dume one day and shout those famous words, "I've been born", used by many surfers since."

(Copyright 2011 Cal Porter. All Rights Reserved. Used here with permission.)

"The Quasimoto". "Baby Dave" Rochlen perfecting the quasimoto in 1964 at Huntington Beach just north of the pier.

(Photo above courtesy of Baby Dave Rochlen. Used here with permission.)


Note the shirt that is on display next to Baby Dave in the above photo taken earlier this month by the undersigned. This is the famed JAMS WORLD lifeguard shirt of some 10 - 15 years ago that features such luminary, celebrated and beloved lifeguards as Cap Watkins, Rudy Kroon, Tom Volk, (Original) Dave Rochlen (Baby Dave's uncle), Matt Kivlin and many others. The front of this shirt bears the signature of original Dave Rochlen, the Santa Monica City Lifeguard who moved to Hawaii and started "Surf Line Hawaii" and is dedicated to his lifeguard pals and features the following remarks: "Those were the Men. They Worked, Played, Lived, Loved and Knew the Ocean like nobody since. Here's to my Heroes..." (Photo Copyright 2011 Will Maguire.)

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Postscript: We just heard from Baby Dave who had some additional remarks about the origin of the "I've been born" utterance. Here goes:

"...in an effort to keep it all honest and straight-I uttered (yelled) out my "I've been born" statement (on another occasion) after being spit out of a super tube at the end of a ride from Malibu's Second Point.

The guy who heard me say that was shooting photos at the point His name was Dick Gustafson and he was Larry Stevenson's Surf Guide Magazine #1 surf photographer. At that time, I rented a studio from Dick's Mom that was located at the top of their home in Santa Monica Canyon on Amalfi Drive. When Dick took the Head Dip I did at Huntington Beach while surfing on the Dewey Weber Surf Team (trying to honor my Hero and Mentor, Micky Munoz) he used the quote he heard at Malibu for the caption of that photo."

Aloha
Dave

Until next time.....


Will Maguire, Editor
"County Recurrent" News
http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

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Thursday, November 24, 2011

"BETWEEN THE PIERS", by Cal Porter

Happy Thanksgiving! Among the things we are thankful for this year are the contributions and stories by Cal Porter. So it is only fitting that we bring to our readership another gem by Cal in celebration of Thanksgiving and in recognition of Cal's generous story telling efforts which celebrate our collective love of the ocean and lifeguarding. Many Thanks to Cal ! 10-4.

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BETWEEN THE PIERS, by Cal Porter


Venice Pier, 1939

I loved that pier, with its Giant Dipper roller coaster, fun house, games of chance, flying circus, salt water taffy and hot dog stands.
This was the 1930’s and there were all kinds of ways for a kid to have fun or get into trouble out there. In addition, my buddies and I dove for the pennies, nickels and sometimes dimes that the tourists would throw into the ocean for us off the end of the pier. The water was crystal clear in those days and you could make enough money for a sugary snow cone in half an hour. And then the rock breakwater visible just beyond the end of the pier was always good for a few lobsters when we searched the rocky bottom wearing our primitive water goggles that Santa Monica Lifeguard Bill O’Connor made for us out of fire hose and glass. The tourists on the pier would sometimes pay up to twenty-five cents for one of the tasty crustaceans. However, Fat Frank, a real character who lived under the end of the pier over the rough water in primordial accommodations and had lobster traps strung out all along the rocks was not too fond of us, but lobsters were plentiful in those days. O’Connor’s goggles were a great improvement over the Japanese swimming goggles we had that distorted your vision under water. Later the diving became much easier when home made face plates were invented and we got our first ones around 1939 or 40, about the same time Owen Churchill invented his black, vulcanized rubber swim fins. The pier also helped create some nice board and body surfing waves for us in those uncrowded days. Then in 1939, for thirty-five cents an hour, I landed a job as a lifeguard in the Venice Salt Water Plunge, the building on the sand just north of the pier in the photo where today the skateboard park stands. A couple of years passed and I was old enough to be a Los Angeles City Beach Lifeguard starting at seventy-five cents an hour and working out of the headquarters at the base of the Sunset Pier, the first pier in the photo above, with the Lick Pier, Ocean Park Pier, Crystal Pier, and Santa Monica Pier in the distance. Today the modern County Lifeguard Headquarters building is on the sandy site where the base of the Sunset Pier once stood and where Venice Boulevard meets the beach.


Between the Piers

“Between the Piers” was the title of our home beach, with the Sunset and Venice Piers on either side. “See you tomorrow between the piers” was the usual so long from your Venice High School pals or perhaps a girl you were hoping to spend some time with on the beach. Our hangout on the sand was right about where the paddle tennis courts are on the beach today. In the photo above you can see the attraction for surfers and bodysurfers with the waves peeling off the sandbar buildup from the two piers. The photo shows a big day with waves forming in deep water beyond the end of the very long pier. In an earlier story I recounted the rough and stormy day of the biggest surf I had ever seen in my young life when we sneaked past the police and the safety barricade that had been erected to keep people off the endangered pier. Fortunately fins had been invented by then when my pal and I jumped off the end of the damaged pier and swam another fifty yards or more out to sea to the very deep water where the storm waves were cresting and beginning their march shoreward, one of which carried me through the passage between the piers and all the way to the beach, the biggest wave and longest bodysurfing ride of my life before or after.

Waves far beyond the end of the damaged Venice Pier

The end of the shorter Sunset Pier to the south was a bodysurfing, jumping off place, too, for some really fine, left breaking shoulders. We would watch and wait for a good set of waves while sitting in the hot sun behind the glass windbreak next to the empty bandstand at the end of the pier and then climb the wall for the long drop into the water and a fast ride to the beach only to run back to the end of the pier and do it all over again, and again. Waiting during lulls in the surf action out there we would play a bit of handball or practice our hand balancing stunts on the empty bandstand stage in order to show off later to anyone we could get to watch, maybe even girls.





Toward the late 1930’s board surfing became popular enough between the piers that the lifeguards decided for safety’s sake to designate a surfing only zone and set out a lifeline separating swimmers from the surfers for the first time on any beach in the U.S. and probably in the world. The lifeline is visible above in the photo of my two buddies with me in the middle ripping on a challenging one foot wave.

A sad day for many of us occurred a few years later at midnight on April 20, 1946, when the Venice Pier was ordered to be closed down and demolished. An amusement pier had been on that site, in one reincarnation or another, since 1905. The City of Los Angeles refused to renew the lease on the historic but run down, gritty old amusement pier, thinking the beach town would be better off without the old relic of better days. Dismantling the rides and concessions and taking down the pier was to begin immediately. This was going to be dangerous work on the rickety old pier, with heavy trucking involved and the possibility of injury or some one falling into the ocean. City lifeguards were sent to the pier by Captain Myron Cox to be on the scene in case of a mishap of some sort. Bill Pruitt and I were assigned the duty there together occasionally and had some interesting experiences for another story. Bill later became a captain with the L.A. City Lifeguards. After the Venice Pier came down the Sunset Pier with its lifeguard headquarters was soon to follow.


Today, sixty-five years later

The pier is gone now and at low tide you can walk on the sand all the way to the breakwater where the ocean was once twenty feet deep. The Sunset Pier where the groin is in the photo is gone also, along with all the other amusement piers from here to Santa Monica. But of course it’s very nice now with the wide, white sandy, unobstructed beach that runs for miles and the concessions all along the boardwalk but somehow it’s just not the same. I take a nostalgia walk out there to the breakwater from time to time where Fat Frank lived under the pier, where we dived for pennies and the lobsters were plentiful, and I stop at the lifeguard tower to tell the young guard that long ago his tower would be under the roller coaster and in ten feet of water, and that just over there where the skateboard park is stood the largest indoor salt water plunge in the world where I was a lifeguard. And when I get that look that says, “Where did this old guy escape from?” I know it’s time to move on.

Cal

("Between the Piers" is Copyright 2011 Cal Porter. All Rights Reserved. All photos courtesy of Cal Porter.)

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Wow! Many Thanks to Cal for another Gem of a story! And lest we forget, we again ask our readership to step up and share a story with us. Please consider contributing to our ongoing effort to tell stories to our group.

10-4.

Until next time.....


"County Recurrent" News
http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

Service • Training • Commitment

*** Keeping the County Recurrent "in the loop"..... whether he/she likes it or NOT ! ***

DISCLAIMER:
County Recurrent is not affiliated with nor sponsored by LACOLA or LACoFD.

*** PLEASE forward to other Recurrents, past and present, so that we can add them to our mailing list. ***

***** ***** ***** ***** *****

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

"Back In The Day", by Steve Hotchkiss

Recently, we received some great photos from veteran LACo Recurrent, Steve Hotchkiss, who has the distinction of having swam for Johnny Joseph at SMC "back in the day", not to mention spending several summers on schedule on Santa Monica South in the mid to late 80's. Many Thanks to Steve for sharing these great photos and for his story telling efforts.

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We begin with a couple of Classic group photos of the Santa Monica South Crews from the Summers of 1985 and 1987. These are absolutely Classic! Have a gander and you are sure to see some of your friends and colleagues when they were alot younger than they are now. Go ahead and smile and laugh. We did and still are. Enjoy!





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And here are three photos from Steve's time at SMC swimming for JJ (x-ref: JJ I SWAM FOR JJ):


Above, SMC 4 x 100 Free Relay Team, SMC vs. Ventura Dual Meet, 1983
Left to Right:
Matt Cardenes-Don't know where he went
Danny Kleiser-LA County lifeguard recurrent (Ret.), now with LA City Fire as an AO.
Fernando Boiteux -LA County Lifeguard Northern Section Chief
Steve Hotchkiss- LA County Lifeguard recurrent, Landscape Contractor

From: Steve Hotchkiss
Subject: Re: 1983 SMC vs. Ventura
Date: November 22, 2011
To: Will Maguire

"Hello Will,

This photo is from the 1983 SMC vs. Ventura dual meet. Coach Joseph (JJ) had gone undefeated in dual meets for something like 13 years, or at least this is what it seemed like since as you know JJ is a God. As a result of this winning record each dual meet had more and more pressure on it to keep winning. We didn't want to break the chain, or let JJ down. The meet came down to the final event which was the mens 4x100 relay. I was fortunate enough to be chosen to swim this event with the other 3 swimmers. Matt Cardenes (left) was our fastest 100 free guy on the team. However, I think Danny Kleiser had the best time that day and Fernando as always was solid. Our relay ended up 1st, we won the meet by 1 point, and held on to the winning record.

As a surprise for JJ at this meet we all brought dress clothes to change into after the meet. He was very surprised to see us all walking out of the locker rooms dressed far above our normal standard of orange team sweats. We went to a steak house for dinner and all had a great time.

It meant a a lot to me to be part of that day and having JJ feel I was worthy to be on that relay team. I don't know if this day stands out to other people on the team since many of them had been swimming for 10+ years and for all I know it was just another meet to them. However, I'm sure many of them still remember the day. I'm not living in the past, but here I am over 25 years later with that day etched in my memory. I am very thankful to have been a part of the team and to have been coached by JJ.

Steve Hotchkiss

SMC Womens team 1983 at Ventura meet, below



1983 SMC swim team at Ventura meet, below



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10-4

Until next time.....



"County Recurrent" News

http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

"County Recurrent" Presents: Rumor and Innuendo



Today we share with our readership several stories that have found their way to our editorial staff this past couple of weeks, in no particular order, but all referencing recurrent lifeguards, past and present, engaged in various pursuits out there in the world.

So here goes:


1. Rumor has it that retired L.A. City recurrent beach lifeguard (Venice, Dockweiler, Will Rogers), Bill Kendall ('48 - '53) recently was cleaning out the family deep freeze at home and found a (frozen) abalone he had snagged while diving back in November 1974! Always an adventurer, Bill let it defrost overnite and then pounded it some and cooked it up. His son Mark reports that his dad, Bill, said (about it): "Trimmed and pounded it today . Cooked and ate it tonite. A little tough. I'll pound the next one longer. Still alive! Good but not as good fresh. 37 years in the freezer! It's probably a record and a tribute to non frost free freezers !"

Way to go, Bill! "A little tough?"... ya think!? :-) Abalone and fish fry at the Kendall's this Friday! :-)

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2. Professional Lifeguard Foundation (aka, PLF) Co-Founder, Paul Silka, MD, recommends the New York Times Bestseller novel, THE HUNGER GAMES, by Suzanne Collins (see photo below). No word back from Dr. Silka on whether or not the PLF will be sponsoring a "PLF Book Club" as yet, however...


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3. Per LACOLA, the Dept.'s new seniority list is now posted online on the password protected LACOLA.org website. Check it out. And speaking of the new seniority list, have you ever wondered who is Number One On The List?!... Well, look no further, folks, because here he is below, shown hard at work this past Sat., Nov. 5th, at SMS Tower #20 alongside Capt. Eugene Attanasio, at left. Who is he? None other than Veteran LACo Recurrent Beach Lifeguard, George Hale (at right in the photo below), who this past summer worked on schedule on Santa Monica North. 10-4, George.


And below, a close up of George, in a photo from the SMN Summer 2011 Beach Crew Party


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4. Recently, we conducted a quiz which LACo Recurrent (Ret.), Terry Flanagan answered correctly... naming Cap Watkins as the lifeguard piloting the boat in the classic b/w photo below from way back in the day. This photo is on display and framed prominently at The OP Cafe, owned by LACo Recurrent (Ret.), Mark Verge, on Ocean Park Blvd. at 31st. St., in Santa Monica, Calif.


( The Ocean Park Cafe;  http://www.opcafe.org )

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4. The answer is YES if you wonder whether beach patrons and fans of the Baywatch tv series still ask to have their photos taken with our lifeguards. Just ask LACo OLS, David Carter, shown below at the Venice Breakwater this past Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011.


5. Recently, "County Recurrent" lobbed the idea for a "Beat The Chief" swim around the Venice Pier on Thanksgiving morning but Chief Frazer, as it turns out, is nursing a torn rotator cuff in his shoulder. So we put out an APB for any other Chief up to the challenge and could not find any available..... so the swim is off and Chad Carvin will have to pay for his own coffee and donut after all... We were thinking of maybe a "Beat The Captain" swim around the pier but it just doesn't have the same ring to it and why bother anyways?!... besides there are too many Captains that are still in really good swimming shape and whole idea of the concept was to cherry pick the Chief and have him pony up for coffee and donuts or muffins for the lifeguards that beat him around the pier. So it's a no go. We will try to organize this at some point in the future. Stay tuned. As an aside, Chief Burnside accepted our challenge but insisted that the swim take place in December in Utah in the snow. We cannot publish the photo exemplar of this undertaking, however.

6. Last but not least, below is famed LACo Public Defender and even more famous as a Veteran LACo Zuma Recurrent lifeguard, namely, Steve Fisher, shown on foot patrol at Zuma on a beautiful Saturday this past September...




We could share more lifeguard news but it's lunch time...


10-4

All Photos by & Copyright Will Maguire. All Rights Reserved.

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Until next time.....



"County Recurrent" News

http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

Service • Training • Commitment

*** Keeping the County Recurrent "in the loop"..... whether he/she likes it or NOT ! ***

DISCLAIMER: County Recurrent is not affiliated with nor sponsored by LACOLA or LACoFD.

*** PLEASE forward to other Recurrents, past and present, so that we can add them to our mailing list. ***

***** ***** ***** ***** *****

Sunday, November 6, 2011

The Los Angeles County Policy of Equity


(Image source: http://bos.co.la.ca.us/ceop.html)


The Los Angeles County Policy of Equity reflects and builds upon our MISSION, VISION, and VALUES, which each employee is responsible for demonstrating in both actions and words.

The values of INTEGRITY AND RESPECT lie at the heart of our Policy of Equity. All employees are required to conduct themselves in accordance with the Policy and all applicable local, county, state, and federal laws.

The purpose of this Policy is intended to preserve the dignity and professionalism of the workplace.....

http://bos.co.la.ca.us/ceop.html

*** Note: The entire Policy of Equity can be downloaded from the internet as a pdf. Just conduct a Google search of "Los Angeles County Policy of Equity".

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10-4


Until next time.....



"County Recurrent" News
http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

Service • Training • Commitment

*** Keeping the County Recurrent "in the loop"..... whether he/she likes it or NOT ! ***

DISCLAIMER:
County Recurrent is not affiliated with nor sponsored by LACOLA or LACoFD.

*** PLEASE forward to other Recurrents, past and present, so that we can add them to our mailing list. ***

***** ***** ***** ***** *****

Friday, November 4, 2011

A "Story" of a "Dory", by Conrad Liberty


(Above photo shows the very same dory discussed in the story below. Photo by Will Maguire.)

Just in from Marla Liberty who just found this amongst Conrad's writings (Conrad Liberty, R.I.P.). A bit more about the dory we heard about in our interview of Conrad this past September.


A "Story " of a "Dory"


Once upon a time, about 30 years ago, a man named Tom Moore, came into the Lifeguards HQ at Santa Monica. He was a script coordinator for the movie business and an ex-lifeguard. He asked if anyone was interested in a "Peterson" Dory. His interest was to divest himself of the 23 foot Double-ender, but to someone who would truly appreciate it. I readily volunteered when he made a proposal for remuneration for the Dory.

A couple of years later, more or less, the refitting of the old Dory began. One of our oldest and most proficient Boat Captains magnanimously assisted in removing the old gunwales and replacing them with a very hard tropical wood called appitong. It was so hard that even wetting down the gunwale numerous times had little effect. Eventually Capt. Ed Perry figured it out, for he had used the same wood on his Peterson Dory. Ed also installed end caps on the rejuvenated craft. In order to facilitate the use of the Dory by many different people, he suggested, and installed a 2 X 4 that looked like a keel for the craft. The holes drilled through the side of the 2 X 4 were spaced evenly to allow the stretchers to be moved for various sized individuals.

Ed Perry was a great asset to the Lifeguard Service as a boat skipper and Lifeguard. Use of the boat was guaranteed for his lifetime. Since he already had a boat he didn't need to use the Phoenix he had so ably repaired until his boat had served its term at sea. He spent a few years rowing it with many different partners.

Captain Steve Saylors painted the boat after I had rented it out to a movie company for the production of "North & South", a Civil War epic mini series with Patrick Swayzee. The boat was used in a river crossing scene, during the Civil War. It was painted "Gray". The movie company agreed to pay for it to be re-painted to it's original white color.

Another participant in the first refurbishment of the Dory was Eddie Love, sanding and scraping and other menial works of labor were appreciated. At the same time Eric Liberty, at about 6 years old, enjoyed being around all the activity, on what would have seemed to him to be the "Titanic".

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Many thanks to Marla and her family for allowing us the privilege to publish this story by Conrad and share it with our lifeguard family.

*** Again we challenge our readership, esp. those of you who have a story that would be enjoyed by all of us, to step up and contribute to this collection. You retain all rights and we even give you credit! We will even type it up, do the lay out and hit the "Publish Post" button! Bring 'em on!

10-4

Until next time.....


"County Recurrent" News

http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com



Service • Training • Commitment

*** Keeping the County Recurrent "in the loop"..... whether he/she likes it or NOT ! ***

DISCLAIMER: County Recurrent is not affiliated with nor sponsored by LACOLA or LACoFD.

*** PLEASE forward to other Recurrents, past and present, so that we can add them to our mailing list. ***


***** ***** ***** ***** *****

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Just Another Rescue??

If you were wondering when we were going to publish another Cal Porter story, wonder no more! Here is a great rescue story! Enjoy!

JUST ANOTHER RESCUE??

It was the summer of 1952, maybe 1953. I had finished the County Lifeguard night shift at Zuma Beach, and after breakfast at home I headed for the private beach at Malibu Colony where I would give swimming lessons and then lifeguard there for the day. The gate-guarded Colony was a pleasant place to work, teaching eager kids to swim, watching over them in the ocean, and organizing activities for them, volleyball, sand games, water sports. And then, as a bonus, there was always the occasional movie star that would stop by to sit and chat. This particular day was much like any other day there, sunny and warm, a good day for swimming. The surf had increased a bit from previous days, but nothing at all treacherous. Of course there was the occasional rescue to be made here on this beach, usually a child whose bravery outstripped his swimming ability; nothing on the order of the churning, rip tide rescues of Zuma Beach. The lifeguard sat on the sand or on a beach chair, and under an umbrella if needed, much like any other beach goer on this very private stretch of sand. And it wasn’t unusual around noon time to welcome an offer from a nice resident of a gourmet sandwich and a cold drink of some kind for lunch break, usually served by the maid, of course. A most pleasant place to work.


The Colony

There was only one doctor in Malibu in those days, almost sixty years ago. Most people traveled to Santa Monica or Los Angeles for medical or dental care. Doctor Peter Salisbury lived in the Colony and his office was nearby. He would take any patients who came to him with their usual great variety of complaints but he was mainly a medical research genius and cardiologist, but he turned no one away. The doctor would often take a short mid-morning workout swim, never venturing far from shore or overestimating his swimming capabilities. But this day was going to be different, he had his eye on those rocks protruding from the sea some distance out, beckoning to him to give it a try. It wasn’t really a long swim but I had never seen him attempt to swim that far out before. Locals referred to these rocks as “Old Joe’s” named for a long time surfer and resident of the Colony. I frequently visited the rocks myself in the early morning hours where I would dive down to a couple of my favorite, narrow caves on the ocean floor to pick up a lobster or two for a family dinner or to deliver to a resident who had requested the tasty crustaceans. But the doctor never came close to swimming that far, but now there he was, on his way. I watched him carefully since the surf was picking up considerably after he managed to swim out there during a lull. He never reached the rocks. Somewhat short of that destination he turned back towards shore starting to look tired, and now I was up and on my way. You don’t want to embarrass a swimmer who doesn’t need your help but he was going to need help. When I reached him the doc was in panic mode, tired, dog paddling and flailing about in an attempt to keep his head above water. I got to him with the rescue float and hung onto him while he calmed down and caught his breath, and then I told him to hold on to the ropes as tight as he could while I towed him back through the breaking surf to the beach. He sat on the dry sand for some time resting, then I walked with him back toward the houses where he said he thought he could make it home from there. He had said very little that day but the next day he appeared at my lifeguard post, said thank you, and handed me twenty-five dollars (about two or three hundred in today’s money). I explained that I couldn’t accept the money, that I was paid as a lifeguard to do the job. He said something to the effect that I would have to throw it in the ocean then because he was not taking it back. He turned and headed back toward the houses. Okay, just another routine rescue, nothing spectacular, end of story. Or was it?



From the arrow to the rocks, the attempted swim.

Now the rest of the story. It is sixty years later, and the year is 2011. On the computer’s “Facebook” the doctor’s daughter, Ann, who was a tiny girl at the time of the rescue, inserted an old photo of her father taken on the beach about that time. By accident I ran across the photo, and then below, where comments can be made, I briefly mentioned that I had one time brought him back to the beach when he swam out too far. Well that started it. Her first and immediate comment back to me after she read my statement was as follows:

“WOWWOWWOWWOWWOWWOW!”. Six Wows. She knew all about the rescue but she was very young at the time and always wondered but never knew who the lifeguard was during all those ensuing years. We began to comment back and forth on Facebook at some length for many days about the incident, and then I made another contact with her to see if it would be alright if I used actual names and some of her quotes in this little story, instead of just paraphrasing, which would then allow me to proceed with the following to go along with the six “wows”. Of course, Ann said.

“I cannot tell you how wonderful it feels to connect with the man who saved my dad. I know for a fact that he could not have made it back to shore without you”. “This touches my heart, Cal. If it weren’t for you, I might not have had my dad with me until he died when I was sixteen”. “He had invented the artificial heart-lung and artificial kidney machines. So you didn’t just save the life of one man or one father, but probably hundreds of thousands of others whose lives are being prolonged today via dialysis. Cal, thanks from the bottom of my heart”.

How does that make an ancient, eighty-seven year old lifeguard feel? Hey, not too bad!

Cal Porter

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"Just Another Rescue", by Cal Porter. Copyright Cal Porter 2011. All Rights Reserved. Used here with permission. Photos courtesy of Cal Porter.

Many Thanks to Cal for continuing to share wonderful stories for all of us to enjoy! And we still want to tell other guards rescue stories, so bring 'em on !

10-4

Until next time.....


"County Recurrent" News
http://CountyRecurrent.blogspot.com

*** *** ***

It's A Whole New Seniority List!


(Will Rogers Lifeguard HQ, Nov. 2, 2011. Photo by & Copyright Will Maguire 2011.)

Head's up, LACo Recurrents! The New Seniority List is out for 2011 - 2012!

To find out your new #, sign in to Telestaff and make yourself available for today and then click on 'picklist' for your new number. Then go back to calendar and 'remove' your availability if you are not planning on working today.

10-4.

"County Recurrent" News